Corticosteroid induced diabetes mechanism

Glucocorticoid therapy is associated with an appreciable risk of bone loss, which is most pronounced in the first few months of use. In addition, glucocorticoids increase fracture risk, and fractures occur at higher bone mineral density (BMD) values than occur in postmenopausal osteoporosis. The increased risk of fracture has been reported with doses of prednisone or its equivalent as low as to mg daily [ 1 ]. Thus, glucocorticoid-induced bone loss should be treated aggressively, particularly in those already at high risk for fracture (older age, prior fragility fracture). In other individuals, clinical risk factor and bone density assessment may help guide therapy. The prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced bone loss will be reviewed here. The clinical features are reviewed separately. (See "Clinical features and evaluation of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis" .)

Myopathies in systemic disease results from several different disease processes including endocrine, inflammatory, paraneoplastic, infectious, drug- and toxin-induced, critical illness myopathy, metabolic, collagen related, [2] and myopathies with other systemic disorders. Patients with systemic myopathies often present acutely or sub acutely. On the other hand, familial myopathies or dystrophies generally present in a chronic fashion with exceptions of metabolic myopathies where symptoms on occasion can be precipitated acutely. Most of the inflammatory myopathies can have a chance association with malignant lesions; the incidence appears to be specifically increased only in patients with dermatomyositis. [3]

Corticosteroid induced diabetes mechanism

corticosteroid induced diabetes mechanism

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